4 Opinions on “Why Don’t The City Have Licensed PE’s on Staff

  1. The last thing we need is PE’s running utilities. The last two were PE’s, they were flops as we all know. Why repeat the mistakes? Having PE next to your name does not translate to good manager in any given field. The city needs professional management in utilities with practical operational and maintenance experience. Someone that sees the big picture and knows how all the different facets of the systems work together. Someone capable of developing scenarios protocols and procedures to be used in the operation of the systems. Where are you going to find an engineer that possesses those qualities. We have low to mid level employees that know more about utilities than a PE. Engineers tend to be narrow minded an deal with things in a black and white manner. I have never seen one yet that was a good people person. Utilities currently has two PE’s employed The one that everyone refers to as peg leg was in charge of the drainage project at Dunlawton and Spruce Creek. Our consulting PE’s did the design and plans. Where did that get us? Glug Glug. PE next to a name guaranties nothing.

    • R. Woodman–I’m inclined to agree with you. The letters PE after a name might indicate something to do with book learning but have little or nothing to do with practical management ability. But I also worry about the letters we’ve seen after the names of some of our recent professional managers–ICMA and FCCMA. These guys seem well-trained in what it takes to survive in a bureaucracy but little or no practical management ability. I think it’s time for our City to take a lesson from the private sector where credentials are all well and good but results carry the most weight. Here’s hoping we get someone in Public Utilities who has a history of getting the job done rather than playing the “go-along” game.

      Mike Gardner
      618 Ruth St
      Port Orange, FL 32127
      386-527-1959
      manddgardner@cfl.rr.com

  2. HERE IS AN ENGINEER JOKE!

    A mathematician, a physicist, and an engineer were all given a red rubber ball and told to find the volume.
    The mathematician carefully measured the diameter and evaluated a triple integral.
    The physicist filled a beaker with water, put the ball in the water, and measured the total displacement.
    The engineer looked up the model and serial numbers in his red-rubber-ball table.

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